The Soviet period has left a lasting legacy upon the region of Central Asia and its peoples. The present ruling elite’s are a legacy of a bygone era, clinging ruthlessly to power. The political trajectories of these new states is in flux. Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan were noted during the 1990s for their pro-Russian stance and orientation. However, during the late 1990s, other major powers have entered the fray, in particular the United States. In the wake of the events of September 11 the United States has furthered its political, economic and now military presence in Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. These states are presenting themselves domestically as well as internationally as ‘front-line states’ in American-led war against terrorism.

Yet the average Muslim within Central Asia has not received much respite. Many thought the collapse of the Soviet Union would permit them to return to Islam as they whole-heartedly desired. The regimes though have had other ideas. The repression the Muslims suffered at the hands of the Soviet Union, continues in a new guise under the newly independent Central Asian regimes. The ‘war against terrorism’ is now permitting states like Uzbekistan to continue its campaign against Islam, albeit now with greater international backing.

Endnotes:

  1. Suny (1999), pp. 167 – 168
  2. Gleason (1997), p. 170
  3. Gleason (1997), p. 171; Akiner (1995), p. 10
  4. Rashid (2002), pp. 38 – 39; Gleason (1997), p. 172
  5. Akiner (1995), p. 7
  6. Akiner (1995), p. 7
  7. Micallef & Svanberg (1999), p. 154
  8. quoted in Ahrari & Beal (1996), pp. 9 – 10
  9. Ahrari & Beal (1996), p. 23
  10. Micallef & Svanberg (1999), p. 156; Akcali (1998), p. 267
  11. The Fergana Valley covers parts of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan.
  12. Rashid (1995), p. 244; RA HISTORY OF ISLAM IN CENTRAL ASIA || Part III
  13. Suny (1999), pp. 167 – 168
  14. Gleason (1997), p. 170
  15. Gleason (1997), p. 171; Akiner (1995), p. 10
  16. Rashid (2002), pp. 38 – 39; Gleason (1997), p. 172
  17. Akiner (1995), p. 7
  18. Akiner (1995), p. 7
  19. Micallef & Svanberg (1999), p. 154
  20. quoted in Ahrari & Beal (1996), pp. 9 – 10
  21. Ahrari & Beal (1996), p. 23
  22. Micallef & Svanberg (1999), p. 156; Akcali (1998), p. 267

Bibliography

  1. Ahrari, M & Beal, James (1996), The New Great Game in Central Asia, McNair Paper, No. 47, (Washington : Institute for National Strategic Studies)
  2. Allison, Roy & Jonson, Lena (2001), ‘Central Asian Security : Internal and o’i (2001), pp. 16-17

Source: Khurasaan.com